Tracking website interactions made easy is the goal of Jentis. Here a rather abstract but very helpful concept comes into place: States. Every moment in time can be a State and with each Jentis takes a snapshot of all properties and variables so you can retrace each data point. So all tracking with Jentis will stay in contact with a State, as all Tags, Triggers and Variables all work in some context to a State. Here is a basic guide to get into this concept.

Users interacting with your website will open the website, wait for it to load, click somewhere and navigate. Additionally all websites are built differently, it can be a single page application or a classic link-per-link navigating website. Now it is up to you to just use the core web protocols (such as “DOM Ready” or “Page Load”) events and define those as States or create your own definitions. In any case: Jentis comes with a lot built in definitions, so technical skills are not mandatory.

As the backbone of the tracking States provide a lot of clarity. With each State you know what variable had which value! With the asynchronous nature of JavaScript and timing being always a challenging task in tracking (talking “race conditions”) the States give you a solid foundation. Variables values will not change in a State, they are finite per each State.

Look at this example, here a user visits a website and loading a page he runs into multiple states. Each variable (per Column) will have a defined value per state.

State

Variable Value:
“Page Title”

Variable Value:
“CSS Selector: Price Tag”

Initialization

My Page Title

undefined

Dom Ready

My Page Title

undefined

Page Load

My Page Title

19.99

Button Click

My Page Title

19.99

Values in HTML and JavScript Objects change. As this is the nature of dynamic websites. With states you can retrace and use each value of a variable as you need it. This gives control and clarity to your tracking implementation.

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